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How to make a circle meander?
#1
hello, i want to make this image into a circle, https://imgur.com/d6douAv

that looks like this https://it.depositphotos.com/185081200/s...ament.html
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#2
I don't know how to make the straight one into a circular one using Gimp. But I woudn't use Gimp for those, I would use Inkscape.

The straight one can be made easily in either Gimp or Inkscape.

For the circular one, I would start from scratch in Inkscape (ie not starting with straight one). Then use Inkscapes's tiled clones.
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#3
First Gimp can do this relatively easily, but..always a but.. there will be distortion and a better way might be to re-build the design from scratch.

However.
You do not give the Gimp version, not a real difference between Gimp 2.8 & Gimp 2.10 but the dialogue looks a little different. Using Gimp 2.10

1. Increase the Canvas height to maybe half the width Image -> Canvas Size You can experiment with this the greater the height the more the design is stretched to fit.
screenshot: https://i.imgur.com/gSdfuVG.jpg

2. Now go to Filters -> Distorts -> Polar Co-ordinates Use 100% circle depth / untick Map from top / use To polar https://i.imgur.com/fjDhCqY.jpg Ok that

3. Then crop by hand or Layer -> Autocrop layer gives this: https://i.imgur.com/Q9wTiOE.jpg
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#4
Likely better done with Inkscape, but if you want to do it with Gimp, look at the image the other way, this is image is the composition of:
  • Three rings of regularly spaced circle arcs
  • Three rings of regularly spaced radius segments
So likely doable with ofn-path-to-shape and ofn-path-waves.
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#5
(06-23-2018, 08:42 AM)rich2005 Wrote: First Gimp can do this relatively easily, but..always a but.. there will be distortion and a better way might be to re-build the design from scratch.
Polar Distort.

Alternatively possible with G'MIC - Deformations - Sphere (has a few more options).



For the best quality, Inkscape is the better tool for the job.
There is a tutorial on my blog: http://gimp-science-labs.blogspot.com/20...orial.html

[Image: 06.+Meander+-+filter.png]

[Image: Meander+Art+3.png]



EDIT: 4 years later, i would probably use the 'Pattern along Path' LPE instead, because here its a good thing the pattern gets distorted.

   
[attachment=1858]
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#6
(06-23-2018, 01:18 PM)Espermaschine Wrote: There is a tutorial on my blog, but posting links to tutorials is against the rules

Not really. See the rules. I don't see any negative points and several positive ones.
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#7
(06-23-2018, 04:07 PM)Ofnuts Wrote:
(06-23-2018, 01:18 PM)Espermaschine Wrote: There is a tutorial on my blog, but posting links to tutorials is against the rules

Not really. See the rules. I don't see any negative points and several positive ones.

all right, edited Big Grin
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#8
Thanks for the answers. I followed the instructions and it end up looking like this lol
https://imgur.com/N9ENg7v

I don't know about inkscape but i'll keep Meander-PaP.svg so thank you.
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#9
With due respect, did you you follow exactly? My guess is your pattern is not the same as the image you referenced. It has space either side.
Of course that space is included when the filter is applied
example before: https://i.imgur.com/FHACdhc.jpg
example after: https://i.imgur.com/ehPv8Ji.jpg

but then Meander-MAP.svg is a vector image produced by applications such as Inkscape. You can import that into Gimp 2 ways, The usual open as an image where you are given choices for size & resolution but then it is a raster (bitmap) image, not exactly set in stone but not scalable without distortion.
or
It might import OK as a path see: https://docs.gimp.org/en/gimp-path-dialog.html which you can scale/to any size without distortion, but then you need to Edit -> Stroke Path to fix as a bitmap onto a layer
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#10
With rich's Polar Transform method i get much better results when i upscale the image height by a factor of two before the transform. Then add a bit of sharpening and it comes out quite nice.
Probably a special case because of the b/w and the blocky design.

   
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