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Newby path question
#1
I'm using Gimp 2.8/64 on win7 [soon to be win10] and I'm a little baffled about what should be a simple path problem.   Simplified, what I'd like to do with the path tool is draw something like this;
                  ----------------------------------
                 |                 |                       |
                 |                 |                       |             

                 |                 |                       |
                  ----------------------------------
                  |                 |  
                  |                 |
                  |                 |
                   ---------------

After I do the first square I can't figure out to make a "connecting" path for the two side squares [so that each is a region I can color
and will stroke properly.

How can I make two or three or more "connected" closed paths.   Thanks
  /b\
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#2
You have to make three distinct squares, with some overlapping sides. You cannot really use a given stroke in two squares. And if you want to select these squares independently for selections; they will have to be separate paths anyway.

Now, if you want to be clever, you can do two paths: the vertical and horizontal rectangles (they will still have (partially) overlapping sides). Then the top left square is the intersection(*) of the selection of the two paths, and the the two squares in the selection of one rectangle from which you subtract(*) the selection of the other.

(*) In the Paths list, right-click first path and Path to selection, right-click second path and either Intersect with selectionor Subtract from selection
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#3
I was afraid of that.  I do want to be able to select all of the separate regions.  I don't quite see how to do that, because if I try put a path-point of a new path on an existing path GIMP seems to want to put that point on the old path.  I see the trick you're talking about with intersecting an subtracting to make the separate selections.   Gonna be tricky though.  Thanks!!

I had another thought -- would it work to do something ike this iteratively? That is, with the above being

sqA | sqB
-------
saC

I could do square A, then *save* it as a jpg. Then run gimp on the jpg, that has only square A in it, and then i could put the boundaries for sqB and saC *exactly* along the edge of A. I'll try that later today.
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#4
Maybe you have paths and strokes mixed up. You need three single-stroke paths. When done with one of the squares square, open the Paths list and create a new path (click the "document" (leftmost) icon at the bottom of the list). What you want is something like the attached XCF.


Attached Files
.xcf   Squares.xcf (Size: 1.51 KB / Downloads: 8)
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#5
(04-11-2019, 12:11 PM)Ofnuts Wrote: Maybe you have paths and strokes mixed up. You need three single-stroke paths. When done with one of the squares square, open the Paths list and create a new path (click the "document" (leftmost) icon at the bottom of the list). What you want is something like the attached XCF.

BCosell, I'm currently working on a project with thirty-some paths and understand your challenges. No squares are involved in my project, but many areas are defined by space between more than one closed path. For the purpose of simple explanation, let's say that I have mirrored crescent shaped paths touching at their tips. The center space is defined only by the two cresents.

To fill the cresents with color, I convert the paths to selections and fill the selection. For my purposes, I use a separate layer for each filled area to create a distinct object, though you could certainly do this on a single layer. The advantage of discrete layers is the ease of moving, transforming or duplicating. Once those fills are in place, I can select the center region with the Fuzzy Select Tool,  fill it on a new layer and have three distinct objects. If I had reason, I could convert the selection defining that central area into a new path on the Paths dialog.

As you play around with this and become more comfortable with selections and paths, you'll discover that you don't need to fill those cresents to define the center space. You can select both cresents, then inverse the selection to define a fillable space between.

If you have overlapping space, as in Ofnut's illustration, managing intersecting selections is another option. One of the delights of GIMP (among many apps) is discovering there are often many paths to the desired end.

Ofnuts, could you please define the difference between path and stroke? My understanding is that strokes are outlines formed from applying brush strokes or color to paths or selections.
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#6
(04-11-2019, 02:44 PM)Ritergeek Wrote: Ofnuts, could you please define the difference between path and stroke? My understanding is that strokes are outlines formed from applying brush strokes or color to paths or selections.

A path is made of one or more strokes, where a stroke is a continuous line (open or closed). If you convert it to a path, a 8 is three strokes: one for the outer envelope, and one for the inside of each of the loops.

For  some basics, see:  https://www.gimp-forum.net/Thread-Paths-Basics
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#7
Thanks all. I see now my problem -- I didn't know about the 'paths' dialog -- I was just messing with the path-tool options. Your three square was exactly the insight I needed. THANKS!! /b\
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