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Remembering a series of color adjustments
#1
Is there a way to remember a series of color adjustments?  If I have a bunch of like images is there a way to apply the same adjustments to all?  If I adjust contrast, saturation, sharpness and curves to one image is there a way to apply the same adjustments to all?  I know I can select previous on an individual basis but I have to do that one by one.

Is this something that can be done with a script? or ?  Can Gimp be programed to execute contrast/previous, saturation/ previous, curves/previous sharpness/previous such that one command is executed for the group of adjustments?
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#2
(09-15-2023, 07:14 AM)zeuspaul Wrote: Is there a way to remember a series of color adjustments?  If I have a bunch of like images is there a way to apply the same adjustments to all?  If I adjust contrast, saturation, sharpness and curves to one image is there a way to apply the same adjustments to all?  I know I can select previous on an individual basis but I have to do that one by one.

Is this something that can be done with a script? or ?  Can Gimp be programed to execute contrast/previous, saturation/ previous, curves/previous sharpness/previous such that one command is executed for the group of adjustments?

There are scripts/plugins that save / restore colour-curves to file. A bit old now and you can equally save the color-curve to a preset.

For the others (maybe including interactive curves), write a python plugin using gimp_gmic_qt commands. Gmic will export settings to the clipboard which simplifies things. Or, add into a 'fave' entry in gimp_gmic_qt.

An alternative is a GEGL plugin from linuxbeaver https://github.com/LinuxBeaver There is a big zip with 20 GEGL filters and to be honest, many are text effects which I do not use. You can sort out yourself. Read there on installation for Windows.

The one I do use is a old version of common-adjustments.so zipped and attached (remember to unzip it). Again you will have to save the adjusted settings as a preset.

EDIT: Sorry, I attached the linux version Wink I do not have the old Windows version, so you can forget this.

Goes like this: https://i.imgur.com/24I2MbS.mp4


Attached Files
.zip   common-adjustments.so.zip (Size: 6.95 KB / Downloads: 134)
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#3
(09-15-2023, 07:14 AM)zeuspaul Wrote: Is there a way to remember a series of color adjustments?  If I have a bunch of like images is there a way to apply the same adjustments to all?  If I adjust contrast, saturation, sharpness and curves to one image is there a way to apply the same adjustments to all?  I know I can select previous on an individual basis but I have to do that one by one.

Is this something that can be done with a script? or ?  Can Gimp be programed to execute contrast/previous, saturation/ previous, curves/previous sharpness/previous such that one command is executed for the group of adjustments?

Contrast/Saturation and Curves, yes, because in fine all you have done is map the color of the pixel to another color and the result depends exclusively on the input color (if you didn't use a selection mask of course). So if you want to reproduce the processing all you have to do it create an Input RGB to output RGB table. This is called a CLUT (Color Look-Up table).

The GMIC filter suite can do this for you

On the first image,
  • You apply contrast/saturation and Curves (*)
  • You use GMIC > Colors > CLUT from After-Before layers (using the new result and the original image) to generate a CLUT
On the other images, you use GMIC > Colors > Apply external CLUT with the CLUT you generated above.

Sharpness is another story because unlike the others, it depends on neighboring pixels.

If you use heavily photo-oriented software like Darktable and Rawtherapee, they can save a "recipe" of your processing that you can re-apply on other images (and yes, they also work on JPG).

Personally, I have a few shell scripts based on ImageMagick for this.


(*) One too many here, because contrast can easily be done as part of  Curves.
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