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Removing Image on Shirt while Maintaining Shading and Lighting Gradient
#1
Simple question from a newbie regarding manipulating a picture.  The software is great and I am really trying to learn how to do things for myself rather than constantly ask the community to help me do what I need.  In that vein, I would like to know how to remove the text and imaging from the shirt below, while actually maintaining proper shading and lighting of the shirt, rather than simply painting over the image on the shirt in black?  Any help or direction would be appreciated.


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#2
You can't really remove the image here. Yo have to paint over, but make a realistic replacement by simulating the creases.

What I did:
  • Select around the image with Freehand, and feather 5pix
  • Sample the T-shirt color in in lightest parts
  • Add new transparent layer ("Black"), and bucket fill selection
  • Add new transparent layer ("Solid noise")
  • Filters>Render>Clouds>Solid noise and tweak X and Y until I get something that looks like creases (3.5,7.8)
  • Set the "Solid noise" layer to multiply
  • Adjust the color of the "Black" layer so that the borders aren't too visible.
   

If you are going to replace the image, no need to be too perfect (and the "solid noise" method can help recreating creases
in the replacement).

Attached xcf.gz can be opened directly by Gimp (it's just a compressed form of XCF).


Attached Files
.gz   Blackened.xcf.gz (Size: 644.9 KB / Downloads: 11)
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#3
Pretty cool job, ofnuts !

So simple, yet effective.
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#4
The darker parts are a bit overdone IMHO. Looks a bit like he spilled his beer, or sweated a lot Smile
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#5
Afterthought: instead of Paint with black/Multiply with synthetic creases an alternative technique could be:
  • Create synthetic creases with solid noise, and stretch the range
  • Run Filter>Distorts>Ripple to add a more natural look
  • Sample lighter/darker tones on original layer as FG/BG colors,
  • Apply gradient map with an FG-to-BG gradient

   
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#6
(03-09-2018, 11:31 AM)Ofnuts Wrote: Afterthought: instead of Paint with black/Multiply with synthetic creases an alternative technique could be:
  • Create synthetic creases with solid noise, and stretch the range
  • Run Filter>Distorts>Ripple to add a more natural look
  • Sample lighter/darker tones on original layer as FG/BG colors,
  • Apply gradient map with an FG-to-BG gradient

Looks amazing.  Thanks for explaining how you did this, so that I can replicate going forward!
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