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databending and raw import settings
#1
Hi all,

I have been trying to find image software for Ubuntu that can replicate a databending process I figured out on my mac. I used GraphicConverter 11 to import a .wav file as raw data, transferred the resulting image to GIMP and modified it, exported that as .bmp, and then used Audacity to import the .bmp's raw data, coming full circle back to audio.

I got my best results when I imported the data as a Grayscale image in Unsigned Long format.
   

With those specifications, aspects of the original file were recognizable in the altered version, and it was not totally destroyed. As a matter of fact, the end audio only differed significantly from the original if I actively edited it in image form (the IWarp effect is great for this). This process yields a very clean transfer.

I now have a new laptop with Lubuntu 18.04.5, for which GraphicConverter is not supported. I tried importing raw data with GIMP, but the import settings do not seem to include Grayscale or Unsigned Long. I've tried a few other image-editing applications, including Converseen, UFRaw, and RawTherapee, but I haven't found anything that will do what I need. Is there any way I can get GIMP to do this, and if not, is there another program for Ubuntu that may work instead?
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#2
File>Open, select file type "Raw image data" (corresponds to .data extension) and then you have a dialog asking the image size and how to interpret the bytes in the file.

   
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#3
(08-26-2020, 06:45 AM)Ofnuts Wrote: File>Open, select file type "Raw image data" (corresponds to .data extension) and then you have a dialog asking the image size and how to interpret the bytes in the file.

interesting- when I get to the dialog it still doesn't give me any of the grayscale options. I notice, however, that you're using GIMP 2.10 and I'm only on 2.8. I'll install the newer version and see if that fixes my problem. Thank you!
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#4
update: It works!

For any interested in trying this themselves, this is my new process: Import settings in GIMP 2.10 should be "Gray 16-bit Little Endian", and the image's horizontal resolution should be a multiple of 20 (I don't understand why, but it works best this way). Normally, audacity will read the bmp backwards, but it will read the rows of the image forwards, which leads to some interesting distortion; if you wish, you can avoid this by flipping the image vertically before exporting it. The raw import setting for Audacity should be "Unsigned 8-bit PCM", and I haven't been able to detect any difference between Big or Little Endian in that stage of the process. The resulting wav file will be several times slower, but you can fix that easily by speeding it up.

Many thanks, Ofnuts!
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