Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Bridge
#1
Giving Gimp 2.10 a whirl here, there is a little difference in using the tools that needs getting used to.

   

Being a rough-old-engineer I like bridges. This one from 1905. Removed the modern overhead electric gantries. Rather than keeping the foreground and maybe desaturating the background, I did it the other way round. Using GEGL C2G I think brings out the nature of this old structure, the texture of the masonry in particular.
Reply
#2
Beautiful architecture !

For a moment i thought the bridge is some kind of CGI.
Reply
#3
Nice. C2G tends to increase local contrast, and a poor man's HDR consist in duplicating the layer, using C2G, on the boittom one, and then putting the top on in Color mode to recover the color.
Reply
#4
(05-01-2018, 11:13 AM)rich2005 Wrote: Giving Gimp 2.10 a whirl here, there is a little difference in using the tools that needs getting used to.



Being a rough-old-engineer I like bridges. This one from 1905. Removed the modern overhead electric gantries. Rather than keeping the foreground and maybe desaturating the background, I did it the other way round. Using GEGL C2G I think brings out the nature of this old structure, the texture of the masonry in particular.

unfortunately, C2G is not (yet) callable from inside a filter (or did I miss it?)
Reply
#5
(05-02-2018, 01:11 PM)dinasset Wrote:
(05-01-2018, 11:13 AM)rich2005 Wrote: Giving Gimp 2.10 a whirl here, there is a little difference in using the tools that needs getting used to.



Being a rough-old-engineer I like bridges. This one from 1905. Removed the modern overhead electric gantries. Rather than keeping the foreground and maybe desaturating the background, I did it the other way round. Using GEGL C2G I think brings out the nature of this old structure, the texture of the masonry in particular.

unfortunately, C2G is not (yet) callable from inside a filter (or did I miss it?)

No, you did not miss anything. 

GEGL operation - no pdb as yet.
Reply
#6
Photo 
Nice bridge Rich Smile

Like to have a go at the original. I gave yours a go and gave it some more texture using mighty details in G'MIC and added colour like someone else mentioned. I didn't know what colour it was supposed to be so just a little.


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   

Smile
Reply
#7
Of course the original is Edwardian-steel-grey, with weathered stone -coloured stonework, a fair smattering of grafitti, and modern attachments Wink

[Image: OT4iClf.jpg]
Reply
#8
As an engineer, I'm surprised you can tolerate the verticals not being vertical Wink

It's the first thing I would have to do.
Reply
#9
(06-07-2018, 03:21 PM)Kevin Wrote: As an engineer, I'm surprised you can tolerate the verticals not being vertical Wink

It's the first thing I would have to do.

A long narrow subject, not that many places where I can get a shot.
If you take a more over-all view of the subject and throw in a few guides, it is not that bad.

[Image: xgXDgKG.jpg]

I like urban landscapes, but so many obstacles. Cars everywhere, light posts, signage, barriers, all in the way. Not to mention graffiti.

Gave up and looked at the graffiti. Working on this at the moment and perspective is a problem. The inside of a pier/arch of a brickwork viaduct. Top quarter is on the arch. I should have taken several shots to stitch together but it was last shot on the way home. Still messing about with it Wink

[Image: FI3wkzH.jpg]
Reply
#10
Btw, since you are on KDE, let me share my technique: start kruler, and Alt-F3>More actions>Keep above others, you can also reduce the opacity. Then you can use your image viewer with kruler above it and tell quickly which images are tilted.
Reply


Forum Jump: