Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Gimp-dog (animation)
#21
I can see a few areas where your "moving selection" strategy would be superior to my "moving image" variant.

For one, I have to perform an "undo" at the beginning of each iteration, to clear the selection frame of the previous image, but even more so, with your method the "offset" is a constant value, moving the view x pixels each turn, whereas with mine the offset is an aggregate figure ( -700,-707, -714, -721....etc)

Giving me an opportunity to brush-up on my basic math tables...


Reply
#22
An alternative and linked to the gimp-dog animation. I used the gmic plugin to animate the dog across the backdrop. It can be used to move a window across, all depends on the mask used. The main settings as this:

   

That gives a full width animation (if you set the frame size same as the image width) so I cropped it down to this:

   

Not as picky on sizes as ofnuts plugin.
Reply
#23
(05-15-2021, 07:13 PM)rich2005 Wrote: An alternative and linked to the gimp-dog animation. I used the gmic plugin to animate the dog across the backdrop. It can be used to move a window across, all depends on the mask used. The main settings as this:



That gives a full width animation so I cropped it down to this:



Not as picky on sizes as ofnuts plugin.

Thanks!!  Of course I'm still interested in Ofnuts' explanation, so I can grow in that direction as well, but your tutorial is valuable to me too.

Question, within the concept of "frame delay" for animation (GIF WebP) , do you think there might be a minimum threshold limitation?

I was playing around animating a copy of an old psychedelic poster,  and was trying to get the most fluid movement I could get.

WebP allows you to specify 10 ms, 5ms, even 1 ms frame delays, but as far as I can determine, they all run at the same speed.

This is detectable because despite the varying frame delays, all three running side by side stay in perfect sync with one another. And you'd expect some variance if one was actually running faster  versus the others?

It's got me wondering if the "interframe pause" between frames becomes the governing factor once the actual frame display delay goes under a certain value


Reply
#24
Quote:Question, within the concept of "frame delay" for animation (GIF WebP) , do you think there might be a minimum threshold limitation?
For gif's displaying in a web browser I seem to recall a minimum, something like 30 ms and a maximum 300ms. Depends on the browser. I think some browsers ignore the delay setting.

Quote:WebP allows you to specify 10 ms, 5ms, even 1 ms frame delays, but as far as I can determine, they all run at the same speed.
There are utilities that will build up a webp animation from individual webp images. Attached a text file for webpmux giving the horrible syntax. However as a simpler work-around there is a Windows utility apng2webp.exe which as you can guess converts an animated png.
Used that, so also in the zip a 5layer.webp animation with variable timings between frames. Open in Gimp and the timing is shown much the same as for a gif. That works with a re-export as a webp animation. Best guess, that is the required format.


Attached Files
.zip   5layer.webp.zip (Size: 55.96 KB / Downloads: 27)
Reply
#25
(05-15-2021, 07:36 PM)rickk Wrote: Thanks!!  Of course I'm still interested in Ofnuts' explanation, so I can grow in that direction as well, but your tutorial is valuable to me too.

Moved your question to the appropriate thread. See answer here.
Reply
#26
(05-15-2021, 07:13 PM)rich2005 Wrote: An alternative and linked to the gimp-dog animation. I used the gmic plugin to animate the dog across the backdrop.

I thought it was slick the way you combined  both animations together.


Reply


Forum Jump: